What is a whirligig?

Handcrafted in New England since 1925

Whirligigs are whimsical, wind-driven expressions of American folk art that first appeared in this country nearly 200 years ago. Traditional designs depict common characters and activities of early American rural life, from farmers milking cows to lumbermen chopping wood. Old-timers called them “comic weathervanes”. The faster the wind blows, the more furiously the figures move.

 

In some parts of the country, whirligigs are known as buzzers, gee-haws, spinners, pinwheels, whirlybirds, or whirlyjigs. Some swear the resulting vibration also drives away moles. Whatever their practical use, the pure pleasure of watching these brightly painted wind toys explains their timeless popularity.

A typical Walston Whirligig is 16" long by 11" high and weighs 2 pounds. Each is constructed of solid white pine (no plastic or plywood), sealed with durable acrylic enamel paints and painstakingly finished with silkscreened and/or hand-painted detail. A lightweight fan (14" in diameter) drives the action, and the base is free-swinging. Walston Whirligigs are tested for functional integrity prior to packaging, ensuring your enjoyment for years to come

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